Eureka! Dog Blog

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Dog Clean-Up

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Someone said to me the other day “of course, everyone thinks their own dog is unusually smart…”  Actually, I have toXena Deep in Thought admit that my dog Xena is quite remarkably NOT smart.  She came to me from Hurricane Katrina, a dog who had seen a lot of trouble.  She was heartworm positive, and I fostered her while she went through the heartworm treatments.  (For anyone who is not sure they need to give their dog heartworm preventive, please understand that heartworms are very damaging to the dog, and the treatment is really nasty and dangerous.  Make sure your dog is adequately protected.)  By the time Xena was well enough to be returned to the shelter, she had bonded so strongly with me that I simply could not take her back there, so I adopted her.

Here are two examples of Xena’s intelligence.

  • I have a dog door in the back door out to the yard.  One day, Xena was preparing to go in through the dog door when I walked up to let myself in through the door itself.  As I opened the door, Xena kept following it around so she could go in through the dog door when it stopped moving.
  • Xena has been exercised along with other dogs at a baseball practice area.  This area is surrounded by chain link fence with one gate in it.  When we let all the dogs out through the gate, Xena ran up and down the fence line, trying to work out why she couldn’t reach the other dogs.  She thought she was in a maze, and someone had to go in and guide her out.

So, you get the idea.  Xena will not win any Nobel prizes.  In the last week, she has managed to create severe clean-up emergencies for herself twice!

The first emergency was a skunk.  Xena was off-leash in an open area, and she and a friend managed to trap a skunk, getting squirted full on the face and neck.  The smell was unbelievable.  Her collar is hanging on a fence outside, and after 4 days, I still can’t bring it into the house because it smells so bad – within 2 hours your eyes start to sting from being in the room with it.  Xena has been banished to sleeping in my bathroom because we don’t to share the air we breathe with her.  Tomato juice works on people, but not on dogs – their skin is different from ours.  We got rid of some of the smell on her with bathing, but we did not have the Skunk-Off product on hand, so the rest of it will have to wear off.

Two days later, she thought she was on the trail of something else, and managed to get all four feet covered in fresh tar.  She came home with long streamers of tar attached to her feet.  After frantic research on the Internet, and some experimentation, we settled on vegetable oil as the most effective solution we had on hand.  It really has done well, although it is a lengthy process.  The oil needs to be rubbed into the tar and left for 24 hours.  During that time, it breaks down the structure of the tar so that it can be washed off with soap and water.  In Xena’s case, she had so much tar worked into her feet that we are still only about half way through the process of cleaning her up.

Xena is still trying to work out why she is suddenly so unpopular.  In any other dog, I would hope that she had learned a lesson from all this.

 

Xena Deep in Thought

Written by eurekapaws

May 29, 2009 at 9:32 pm

Posted in General

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